6 Things You Can Do for Your Valuable Rugs During the Coronavirus Outbreak

Rug on Staircase6 Things You Can Do for Your Valuable Rugs During the Coronavirus Outbreak

1. Get to know your rugs: the size, construction, age, pattern, colors, materials, and any relevant history. If you did not receive this information when you bought your rug, contact Behnam Rugs at 972-733-0400, as we can help you ascertain these things.

 

2. Create a portfolio for your rugs. Take well-lit photos of your rugs, or have a professional do it for you. Find out the origin, material, construction, age, and value of each rug. Include this information in the portfolio. To do this accurately, you may need an appraisal or evaluation. Behnam Rugs offers verbal appraisals as well as written appraisals for insurance purposes. That brings us to the next point.

 

3. Get your rugs appraised and evaluated. Instead of in-person appraisals, Behnam Rugs is now offering virtual appraisals. Measure your rug, take note of the material and any other relevant information, and then give us a Facetime call. Our experts will tell you exactly how much your rug is worth, as well as its origin and age. If you are interested in cleaning or restoration, we will tell you what that will cost. Call 972-733-0400 to set up a Facetime call.

 

4. Estate plan your rugs. Your estate plan should include your valuable art and furnishings if it doesn’t already. Using the information you gathered during appraisal, decide how you want your rugs to be used. Will a family member inherit the rugs? Will they be donated for a tax credit? It is smart to have a plan in place in case of unforeseen circumstances. This is ensures your rugs will be taken care of according to your wishes and will maximize family harmony.

 

5. Have your rug professionally cleaned. Rugs can be breeding grounds for germs. Behnam Rugs cleans and sanitizes every rug using a proprietary 10-Step Hand Washing Process that ensures your rugs are returned to you beautifully restored. In addition, our technicians wear gloves, masks, and foot coverings to stop the spread of germs when out for delivery or pick up. You do not need to be in the room when they pick up or deliver your rug for free.

 

6. Inspect your rug for moths. Rugs, especially ones placed in rooms that do not experience a lot of traffic or light, can become breeding grounds for destructive moths. Now that you’re home, it’s the perfect time to check for them. Look for threadbare patches on your rugs. Make sure to inspect corners and turn up those edges to check underneath, as they are more likely to eat the back of the rug first. Often times, moths and their larvae hide on the underside of your rug. The moths that eat wool will be buff in color and are smaller than the average house moth. Their eggs look like grains of rice. Moth larvae and their casings look like sticky yarns adorning the back of your rug.

There you have it, 6 ways to stay productive during the Coronavirus outbreak. Call 972-733-0400 to schedule cleaning today.

Threadbare Rugs: Moths, Vacuuming, and General Wear

Threadbare rug

Threadbare Rugs: Moths, Vacuuming, and General Wear

So, you’ve noticed your rug is looking a bit threadbare, but you don’t know what the culprit is. Lucky for you, we’ve written this blog so you can identify the cause of damage and act accordingly.

The first cause of threadbare patches is moths.

The moths themselves don’t actually do this damage, it’s really their ravenous larvae. These pests can cause massive amounts of damage. First look on the underside of your rug for larvae. The larvae look like fuzzy yarn or patches of webbing. If you spot what looks like grains of rice, those are eggs- a very bad sign.

Next, look for divots in the wool pile that look like holes or white spots. These divots may be small or there may be large threadbare patches depending on if your rug is pure wool or wool mixed with another fiber that moths don’t like as much. Wool rugs are moths’ favorite material to eat. It’s important to have your rug professionally cleaned if you spot moth damage.

Make sure to check on rugs that lay in dark places, as these are moths’ favorite breeding grounds. If part of a rug lays under furniture, move it when you check for moths as the pests are most likely to be hiding there. Moths like quiet, dark places with low air circulation and plenty of wool to eat.

The next cause of threadbare rugs is vacuuming.

Improper vacuuming is very harmful to fine rugs, especially the fringes. Most rugs should NOT be vacuumed with the beater brush, especially if they are handmade. If you have been vacuuming a handmade rug with the beater brush, STOP! You may have already caused damage to your rug.

So what does vacuum damage look like? Vacuum damage typically causes sprouting, which is when the knot heads become visible after being pulled. The knot heads will appear as little white dots or freckles across the face of your rug. Vacuuming can also cause serious shedding that leaves you with threadbare or thinning patches.

In addition, if your fringes look ragged, you can blame vacuuming with the beater brush. Avoid the fringes when vacuuming. If your rug has been damaged by heavy vacuuming, it may be salvageable. Bring it to the experienced professionals at Behnam Rugs for an evaluation to find out if the damage can be reversed or minimized.

Finally, some rugs become threadbare after general wear and tear.

Maybe the rug has been in the family for generations, or it’s in a high traffic area like an entryway. If you have a very fine rug, make sure you are not placing it in an area where it will be constantly trod on. One way to alleviate some of the wear on your rug is to rotate it once a year. This will prevent threadbare patches to some degree.

Another issue is not using rug padding. Choosing not to use padding will shorten the life of your rug and result in threadbare patches in areas of stress. In addition, furniture that rests on top of the rug for extended periods of time can wear your rug. Placing coasters under the rug in the spots where furniture rests can relieve tension and make it less likely that the furniture exerts pressure that will damage the rug.

Finally, two main causes of threadbare patches are that the rug is not professionally washed every 4 to 5 years, or the rug has been cleaned by carpet cleaners. Never entrust your rug to a carpet cleaner- they will damage it! When it comes to fine, handmade rug cleaning, experience matters. Trust the professionals at Behnam Rugs, we have generations of knowledge, expertise, and care. Give us at call at 972-733-0400.

Rug Storage: Costly Mistakes

Storage unitsCostly Rug Storage Mistakes

Storing your rug is generally a simple process. However, there are some things you should know and do when putting a fine rug in storage to ensure its longevity in the years to come.

IMPROPER RUG STORAGE WILL LEAD TO COSTLY DAMAGE.

The first mistake is not cleaning your rug before storing it. If you don’t have your rug professionally cleaned before storing it, you are likely storing a rug covered in dirt, dander, and stains that will attract moths and mice. In addition, the wool fibers in your rug contain an oil which keeps the fibers flexible. A dirty rug prevents oxygen from reaching the oil, resulting in a stiff and delicious rug for moths.

At the very least, vacuum the rug extensively without using the beater brush extension. Vacuum the front and back of the rug to remove all dirt particles and possible moths and eggs.

The next mistake is not wrapping your rug in cotton fabric or a piece of muslin. An unwrapped rug will become mice and moth fodder. Make sure to completely cover your rug, including the ends, so that mice cannot nest inside your rug.

Do not store your rug in a material that doesn’t breathe such as a plastic tarp or piece of paper, which moths love to eat. Your rug needs oxygen.

Make sure to roll your rug in the direction of the grain to minimize stress. You can determine this by feeling with your hand.

In addition, you should be storing your rug horizontally to protect the rug’s shape and on top of something so that it is not touching the floor. This prevents water damage and makes it harder for rodents and pests to get to your rug. Never fold your rug. This can lead to creases that don’t go away.

Another mistake is storing a wet rug. This will result in mold and eventual rotting of the rug fibers. So will storing a rug in a space with high humidity like a basement.

Make sure that the storage facility you select maintains a constant temperature. Fluctuations in temperature can cause damage. Choose a climate controlled storage unit.

Rugs do best in spaces that are dry and cool. If you choose, you may set moth and mice traps near the rug. Air circulation around the rug is important to prevent nesting.

Thoroughly clean the storage unit or space you have chosen to store the rug. Don’t leave any yummy dirt or cracks that mice could enter through.

Not checking on your rug every six months or so is the next mistake. You need to routinely check on your rug to make sure moths and carpet beetles aren’t making a meal of your rug. While you’re there, clean the space the rug is in and the rug itself, as dust has likely accumulated.

Choose an area with little to no sunlight. Direct light can fade the rug’s beautiful colors.

Finally, have your rug appraised before storing it. Behnam Rugs can do this for you. Take a photograph and get insurance based on the appraisal.

All these tips will make your rug last longer and prevent harm to it.

If you aren’t sure where to store your rug, trust the experts at Behnam Rugs. The storage facility at our 18000 Preston Road showroom provides the optimal conditions for your storing rug, as they are required to ensure the longevity of the rugs we display and sell. Call us at 972-733-0400 to discuss storing your rugs.

Rug Storage Tips

Proper Rug Storage

Four wrapped rugs
So you’ve decided to store your heirloom rug. It’s vital that you follow the advice outlined below to ensure your rug retains its value and doesn’t fall victim to mice, moths, water, or temperature damage.

An improperly stored rug can become a breeding ground for hungry and destructive moths. There are a few tips you should follow if you are preparing to store your precious rug. Choosing not to follow these tips can result in a damaged rug that needs costly repairs or even the complete destruction of your rug.

The first thing you’ll want to do is have your rug washed and cleaned professionally. It may seem like a waste to clean a rug that’s going into storage, but a dirty rug poses a multitude of risks.
Next, make sure to store your rug in a dry, climate controlled space. Both extreme heat and extreme cold can cause a variety of issues.

Once you have selected a spot to store your rug(s), thoroughly clean the space. Sweep, vacuum, and if you have access to an electric leaf blower, blast the area, especially nooks and crannies where pests may be hiding.

Once your rug and the storage area are clean, you’re ready to store your rug. Use a bed sheet or muslin to wrap your rug completely so that no moths can get in and damage the rug. Why wrap it in bed sheets and cotton fabrics? The wool, silk, and cotton fibers your rug is made of need oxygen in order to survive.

Never wrap your rug in plastic or paper. Moths eat paper and plastic doesn’t breathe, resulting in condensation that leads to mold, changes the colors of the rug, and imparts a musty smell.

You will probably want to wrap your rug around a cardboard cylinder so that it has no trouble standing up if it’s stored in a small space. It is always a good idea to store rugs in a roll elevated from the floor. Make sure to store your rug vertically.

Next, inspect your rug and its covering for dampness. If your covering has become damp, remove it immediately and find a new cover for the rug. If you’re vigilant about checking your storage area, it’s likely that a moist rug covering will not have had time to dampen and damage your rug.

If you want to be extra safe, install a few moth and mouse traps around your rug in its storage area as a preventative measure. We highly recommend a rug in storage be opened outside every two to three years for direct sunlight to penetrate both the front and back sides of your rug. This kills bacteria and any moths or eggs that have latched on to your rug. Vacuuming the front and back at this time improves longevity as well.

Finally, don’t forget about your rug! Check the storage area frequently for dust and debris that can attract moths, mice, squirrels, and termites. The oils and protein in your rug fibers make a nutritious meal for these pests.

And there you have it! Everything you should do to store your rug and prevent damage. Following these tips will result in a rug that retains its value over time.

Behnam Rugs offers free advice if you’re not sure where or how to store your fine rug. We also offer rug wrapping services and sell moth traps. Call 972-733-0400 for more information.

Check out the rug wrapping process below:

Wrapping a rug in sheets

Wrapping a rug in sheets

Wrapping a rug in sheets

 

How to Store Your Rug to Avoid Moth Damage

A rug damaged by mothsStoring Your Rug to Prevent Moth Damage

So you’ve decided to store your heirloom rug. Moths are one of the biggest threats to the integrity of fine Oriental rugs in storage. They love dark spaces and dirty rugs. That’s why it’s essential to store your fine Oriental rug properly.

An improperly stored rug can become a breeding ground for hungry and destructive moths. There are a few tips you should follow if you are preparing to store your precious rug. Choosing not to follow these tips can result in a damaged rug that needs costly repairs or even the complete destruction of your rug.Destructive Rug Eating Moth

The first thing you’ll want to do is have your rug cleaned professionally. This ensures that no tasty tidbits of dirt remain to entice pests.

Next, make sure to store your rug in a dry, climate controlled space. Once you have selected a spot to store your rug(s), thoroughly clean the space. Sweep, vacuum, and if you have access to a leaf blower, blast the area, especially nooks and crannies where insects may be hiding. Moths love dark, quiet areas.

Once your rug and the storage area are clean, you’re ready to store your rug. Use a bed sheet or muslin to wrap your rug completely so that no moths can get in and damage the rug. Why wrap it in bed sheets and cotton fabrics? The wool, silk, and cotton need oxygen in order to survive. Never wrap your rug in plastic or paper. Moths eat paper.

You will probably want to wrap your rug around a cardboard cylinder so that it has no trouble standing up if it’s stored in a small space. It is always a good idea to store rugs in a roll elevated from the floor.

Finally, don’t forget about your rug! Check the storage area frequently for dust and debris that can attract moths, mice, squirrels, and termites. The oils and protein in your rug fibers make a nutritious meal for these pests.

Next, inspect your rug and its covering for dampness. If your covering has become damp, remove it immediately and find a new cover for the rug. If you’re vigilant about checking your storage area, it’s likely that a damp rug covering will not have had time to dampen and damage your rug.

If you want to be extra safe, install a few moth traps around your rug in its storage area as a preventative measure. We highly recommend a rug in storage be opened outside every two to three years for direct sunlight to penetrate both the front and back sides of your rug. Vacuuming at this time improves longevity as well.

And there you have it! Everything you should do to store your rug and prevent moth damage.

Call 972-733-0400 if your rug has moth damage and is in need of repairs.