5 Things You Can Do for Your Valuable Rugs During the Coronavirus Outbreak

Rug on Staircase6 Things You Can Do for Your Valuable Rugs During the Coronavirus Outbreak

  1. Get to know your rugs: the size, construction, age, pattern, colors, materials, and any relevant history. If you did not receive this information when you bought your rug, contact Behnam Rugs at 972-733-0400, as we can help you ascertain these things.
  2. Create a portfolio for your rugs. Take well-lit photos of your rugs, or have a professional do it for you. Find out the origin, material, construction, age, and value of each rug. Include this information in the portfolio. To do this accurately, you may need an appraisal or evaluation. Behnam Rugs offers verbal appraisals as well as written appraisals for insurance purposes. That brings us to the next point.
  3. Get your rugs appraised and evaluated. Instead of in-person appraisals, Behnam Rugs is now offering virtual appraisals. Measure your rug, take note of the material and any other relevant information, and then give us a Facetime call. Our experts will tell you exactly how much your rug is worth, as well as its origin and age. If you are interested in cleaning or restoration, we will tell you what that will cost. Call 972-733-0400 to set up a Facetime call.
  4. Estate plan your rugs. Your estate plan should include your valuable art and furnishings if it doesn’t already. Using the information you gathered during appraisal, decide how you want your rugs to be used. Will a family member inherit the rugs? Will they be donated for a tax credit? It is smart to have a plan in place in case of unforeseen circumstances. This is ensures your rugs will be taken care of according to your wishes and will maximize family harmony.
  5. Have your rug professionally cleaned. Rugs can be breeding grounds for germs. Behnam Rugs cleans and sanitizes every rug using a proprietary 10-Step Hand Washing Process that ensures your rugs are returned to you beautifully restored. In addition, our technicians wear gloves, masks, and foot coverings to stop the spread of germs when out for delivery or pick up. You do not need to be in the room when they pick up or deliver your rug for free.
  6. Inspect your rug for moths. Rugs, especially ones placed in rooms that do not experience a lot of traffic or light, can become breeding grounds for destructive moths. Now that you’re home, it’s the perfect time to check for them. Look for threadbare patches on your rugs. Make sure to inspect corners and turn up those edges to check underneath, as they are more likely to eat the back of the rug first. Often times, moths and their larvae hide on the underside of your rug. The moths that eat wool will be buff in color and are smaller than the average house moth. Their eggs look like grains of rice. Moth larvae and their casings look like sticky yarns adorning the back of your rug.

There you have it, 6 ways to stay productive during the Coronavirus outbreak.

Hand Washing Fine Rugs and Rug Sanitization

GermsHand Washing Fine Rugs and Rug Sanitization

With the Coronavirus in the news and confirmed cases spreading day by day, you may be concerned about the cleanliness of your home. Furniture and rugs can be breeding grounds for bacteria, viruses, and other germs. Did you know thousands of germs and bacteria inhabit the average square inch of your rug? Often these organisms are less than harmless. You can’t exactly pour hand sanitizer all over your precious rugs, so what can you do?

Have your rugs professionally cleaned and sanitized.

Rugs retain dander from pets and humans, as well as dirt, odors, and germs. Sanitizing your rugs is one way to feel a bit safer, especially if guests frequently visit your home. A clean and sanitized rug will also improve your home’s air quality, letting you breathe easier. Your home should be a place where you are at lower risk for exposure to germs, and a sanitized rug is one way to improve the cleanliness of your environment. If you plan on working from home in the future, clean rugs are a necessity.

Want to learn more about Behnam Rug’s rug washing and sanitizing procedures? Keep reading.

While Behnam Rugs never uses harsh chemicals on your rugs, we do thoroughly hand wash them many times. Our methods are more effective at removing dirt, dander, and bacteria because they are more thorough. We never use machines to protect your rug from mechanized harm.

Our technicians use paddles to massage the front and back of your rug and loosen any particulates. The front and back are then washed three times each at a minimum. Every rug is rinsed with non-recycled Dallas drinking water. Organic shampoos rinse away built up germs, while enzymes cut through pet odors. You are left with a rug that looks and smells much better than before.

While it is impossible to guarantee your rug is free from bacteria and viruses, the majority of them should be gone.

You can rest easy knowing your rug is no longer a breeding ground for dangerous germs and is unlikely to still be home to the thriving bacterial ecosystem it was before.

In addition, Behnam Rugs is enacting stricter delivery procedures for those that need their freshly sanitized rugs delivered. Our technicians wear masks, gloves, and foot coverings to minimize the risk of exposure. For those visiting our Dallas showroom, please note that all staff are required to wash their hands every hour at a minimum.

Rug Cleaning Advice from a Specialist

Man standing in front of rugs

Rug Cleaning Advice from a Specialist

This blog will give you the tools you need to effectively care for your rug at home.

Things you SHOULD be doing

  • Sweeping your rug
  • Gently vacuuming
  • Rotating your rug
  • Padding your rug
  • Addressing spills and stains immediately
  • Checking your rug for moths
  • Inspecting your rug every year for damage
  • Getting your rug professionally cleaned every 3 to 5 years

Things you SHOULDN’T be doing

  • Vacuuming your rug with the beater brush
  • Vacuuming the fringes of your rug
  • Letting stains set into your rug
  • Using your rug with no padding
  • Storing your rug in dark, quiet places without checking on it periodically for moths
  • Leaving your rug in the same place for years
  • Allowing direct sunlight to hit your rug all day for extended periods of time
  • Using carpet cleaning solutions on your rug
  • Allowing carpet cleaners or inexperienced individuals to¬† clean your rug

In-depth breakdown of the SHOULDs:

Sweeping your rug improves its health by loosening dust and debris from the pile and top of your rug. Sweep in the direction of the pile. You can ascertain this by running your hand over the rug: sweep in the direction of the grain.

If you have a handmade rug, it’s okay to vacuum it every week or so, but only if you don’t use the beater brush.

Rotate your rug every six months to a year to allow for even wear and a smaller likelihood of threadbare patches.

If you spill something on your fine, handmade rug, address it immediately. Use a towel to blot up excess liquid and a bit of water to dilute the stain. Call the experts at Behnam Rugs and ask us the best way to remove your specific stain at 972-733-0400.

Make sure to check your rug for moths, eggs, and larva every six months or so by lifting the edges of the rug and checking underneath. Make sure to check areas that lay underneath furniture as well.

Next, you need to inspect your rug every year or so. If you spot any damage, it’s better to repair your rug sooner rather than later, as damage tends to get worse with time.

Finally, your rug MUST be professionally cleaned at least every five years. Why? Because professional cleaning removes debris and dirt that your vacuum simply cannot reach. If left untended, these particulates effectively cut through the pile of your rug due to their sharp edges, resulting in thinning and patchy spots. In addition, professional cleaning removes allergens, and odors that you may be nose-blind to, as well as tough, unsightly stains. If you love your rug, it deserves regular professional cleaning to extend its longevity.

For more information on how to clean your rug at home, please read our article published in the Dallas Morning News.

In-depth breakdown of the SHOULDN’Ts

Never, ever, ever vacuum a handmade rug with the beater brush. This attachment is too rough on the natural fibers and can cause unraveling and sprouting. Sprouting causes white knot heads to be visible on the face of your rug due to pulling. When vacuuming, leave the fringes alone. Gently sweep them to get rid of dirt instead of vacuuming.

Next, always address spills and stains immediately. Not doing so allows it to set, making it hard to remove yourself. Professionals can usually remove tough stains, but ideally if you get to the stain quickly you can get rid of it yourself.

The next mistake is not using rug padding. Padding is an inexpensive way to extend the life of your rug. Not to mention an unpadded rug is a safety hazard. Without padding your rug will experience more pressure than it should, especially underneath furniture. This can lead to permanent indentations in the shape of said furniture.

Next, you don’t want to leave your rug in a dark, quiet place for months or years without checking it for moths. Moths love spaces like these and their larva can do a lot of damage in a short amount of time in the right conditions. That’s why it’s so important to check the front and back of the rug for moths, eggs, and larva.

It is also important to rotate your rug so that the rug experiences wear evenly. This will prevent the rug from wearing out as fast.

If you have a fine rug, you probably want to display it in a room with good lighting. However, you should be careful about the amount of direct sunlight your rug receives. Ideally, you should place your rug in a room with curtains or blinds so that when you are not showing your rug off it’s not experiencing bright natural light. Sunlight can fade your rug after extended periods of time.

Next, NEVER use carpet cleaners on a wool, silk, or cotton rug that is handmade.

And lastly, do not trust your handmade rug to individuals who do not specialize in rug washing, such as carpet cleaners or inexperienced individuals. Only entrust your rug to the care of those with decades of experience washing fine rugs BY HAND.

How to Vacuum Your Rug

Vacuum Cleaning Rug

How to Vacuum Your Rug

How to vacuum your rug depends on the material and construction of your rug. Flat weaves, handmade rugs, tufted rugs, and machine-made rugs all require different vacuum techniques, as do silk, cotton, wool, viscose, and synthetic fibers. If you learn anything from this article, let it be this: Never vacuum your rug before knowing its construction, material, and how heavy vacuuming will affect it! Know your rug and know your vacuum cleaner to see if they are a good match. Remember, cleaning and janitorial services that offer to clean fine rugs use industrial-grade vacuum cleaners which damage rugs easily in a short time.

So, how can you vacuum your rug safely? Read on to find out…

How to Vacuum Flat Weave Rugs

Flat weave rugs are reversible due to the nature of their construction, and thinner than traditional rugs. For flat weaves, you want to use a vacuum with enough suction to lift dirt, but not so strong as to do damage. This means you should NOT use the beater brush. A brush-less vacuum is the way to go- leave the upright vacuum in the closet. In addition, use your hand to determine the direction of the weave. Do your best to vacuum in the direction of the weave- not against the grain. Be careful with the fringe as well.

How to Vacuum Handmade Rugs

When it comes to handmade rugs, you must consider the fibers it’s made of. To be safe, DO NOT use the beater brush unless you have spoken to a professional first. Call the experts at Behnam Rugs for advice at 972-733-0400.

How to Vacuum Tufted Rugs

Tufted rugs are simpler and faster to make than most other constructions. Most tufted rugs are of lower quality, though there are some that use high quality wool or even silk. These rugs are more likely to shed than other constructions. The problem with this is that sometimes the wool is so processed that it breaks easily, and vacuuming can make this worse. Therefore, it’s safer NOT to use the beater brush. Another option is to use the upholstery attachment in the direction of the pile.

How to Vacuum Machine-Made Rugs

Machine-made rugs are generally sturdier than handmade. This means that it is okay to use the beater brush, as long as the rug is not made of real silk or any other natural fiber. Avoid vacuuming the fringes with the beater bar though.

How to Vacuum Silk

Silk is the most delicate of rug materials. While silk rugs can benefit from vacuuming, you have to be careful. NEVER use the beater brush and vacuum in the direction of the pile. If you use the beater brush on a silk rug, you are likely to cause unsightly sprouting. Sprouting occurs when the yarns that make up the pile are pulled, resulting in white heads coming to the top of the rug where they are visible. When this happens, you need a professional to fix it.

How to Vacuum Cotton

Like silk, cotton is delicate. It’s better to vacuum without the beater brush.

How to Vacuum Wool

Wool rugs are generally the strongest of handmade rugs, they don’t shed easily. Because of this, you do not want to vacuum with the beater brush. Some people believe vacuuming wool rugs with the beater brush is okay, and helps minimize shedding. In reality, you are breaking off fibers that were not ready to shed, which can lead to sprouting and bald patches.

How to Vacuum Viscose or Artificial Silk

Viscose silk is quite delicate and breakable. Beater bar vacuums can exacerbate breakage, so use suction only for these rugs.

How to Vacuum Most Other Synthetic Fibers

Vacuums are great for lifting dirt from most synthetic fibers, such as polypropylene and nylon, and you can even use the beater brush! Call the experts at Behnam Rugs and let them know the exact fiber before vacuuming to be safe.

Always protect the fringes and side binding of your rug. The safest way to clean your rug is not to vacuum at all, and to instead use a sturdy, yet simple straw broom. Sweeping can improve the health of your rug.