Threadbare Rugs: Moths, Vacuuming, and General Wear

Threadbare rug

Threadbare Rugs: Moths, Vacuuming, and General Wear

So, you’ve noticed your rug is looking a bit threadbare, but you don’t know what the culprit is. Lucky for you, we’ve written this blog so you can identify the cause of damage and act accordingly.

The first cause of threadbare patches is moths.

The moths themselves don’t actually do this damage, it’s really their ravenous larvae. These pests can cause massive amounts of damage. First look on the underside of your rug for larvae. The larvae look like fuzzy yarn or patches of webbing. If you spot what looks like grains of rice, those are eggs- a very bad sign.

Next, look for divots in the wool pile that look like holes or white spots. These divots may be small or there may be large threadbare patches depending on if your rug is pure wool or wool mixed with another fiber that moths don’t like as much. Wool rugs are moths’ favorite material to eat. It’s important to have your rug professionally cleaned if you spot moth damage.

Make sure to check on rugs that lay in dark places, as these are moths’ favorite breeding grounds. If part of a rug lays under furniture, move it when you check for moths as the pests are most likely to be hiding there. Moths like quiet, dark places with low air circulation and plenty of wool to eat.

The next cause of threadbare rugs is vacuuming.

Improper vacuuming is very harmful to fine rugs, especially the fringes. Most rugs should NOT be vacuumed with the beater brush, especially if they are handmade. If you have been vacuuming a handmade rug with the beater brush, STOP! You may have already caused damage to your rug.

So what does vacuum damage look like? Vacuum damage typically causes sprouting, which is when the knot heads become visible after being pulled. The knot heads will appear as little white dots or freckles across the face of your rug. Vacuuming can also cause serious shedding that leaves you with threadbare or thinning patches.

In addition, if your fringes look ragged, you can blame vacuuming with the beater brush. Avoid the fringes when vacuuming. If your rug has been damaged by heavy vacuuming, it may be salvageable. Bring it to the experienced professionals at Behnam Rugs for an evaluation to find out if the damage can be reversed or minimized.

Finally, some rugs become threadbare after general wear and tear.

Maybe the rug has been in the family for generations, or it’s in a high traffic area like an entryway. If you have a very fine rug, make sure you are not placing it in an area where it will be constantly trod on. One way to alleviate some of the wear on your rug is to rotate it once a year. This will prevent threadbare patches to some degree.

Another issue is not using rug padding. Choosing not to use padding will shorten the life of your rug and result in threadbare patches in areas of stress. In addition, furniture that rests on top of the rug for extended periods of time can wear your rug. Placing coasters under the rug in the spots where furniture rests can relieve tension and make it less likely that the furniture exerts pressure that will damage the rug.

Finally, two main causes of threadbare patches are that the rug is not professionally washed every 4 to 5 years, or the rug has been cleaned by carpet cleaners. Never entrust your rug to a carpet cleaner- they will damage it! When it comes to fine, handmade rug cleaning, experience matters. Trust the professionals at Behnam Rugs, we have generations of knowledge, expertise, and care. Give us at call at 972-733-0400.

Are Robotic Vacuums Safe for Rugs?

Roomba damaging a rugRobotic Vacuums are not Rug Safe

It’s a tale as old as time- a customer brings their fine handmade rug in for repairs at Behnam Rugs because they believe their dog has chewed it. While this does happen, the more likely culprit is actually your vacuum cleaner, especially automatic robot vacuums. Robotic vacuums spell disaster for your precious rugs.

Rug Damage: How to Tell the Difference Between Pet Damage and Vacuum Damage

So, how can I tell if Spot chewed my rug or if the vacuum cleaner is to blame?

Well, when dogs chew on rugs, they typically remove whatever they have been chewing on completely, leaving a torn spot. Whereas robotic vacuums and vacuuming with a beater brush chews up the edges of your rug but leaves the damage without removing it.

These machines almost always damage the corners of a rug. They can’t tell a stray piece of yarn from handmade fringe, which is the first casualty when it comes to robotic vacuum damage. Still unsure if your dog is responsible for the damage or the vacuum? Check out the image below.

Rug chewed by dog

As you can see, the dog damage looks like someone hacked the edge off the rug with very dull scissors. On the other hand, the vacuum damage creates torn fringe and a look that says, “I’ve been chewed up!”

Robotic vacuums and the beater brush simply don’t have enough power to remove the damage they cause. Instead, they chew the edges without removing them, resulting in tears, damaged fringe, and general unraveling.

So, what can you do to prevent vacuum casualties? Don’t use robotic vacuums! And never vacuum with the beater brush. You may be wondering how you will clean your fine rug. Luckily, vacuuming is completely safe when vacuuming without an extension or beater brush. Sadly, it’s probably time to retire your robotic vacuum.

However, having to put a bit more effort into cleaning your home is a small price to pay for a rug in perfect condition. As for dog damage, this is harder to prevent. Keeping an eye on your pet and not leaving them unsupervised with a fine rug is about the extent of preventative measures.

If your fine handmade rug has been chewed up by vacuum or dog, don’t despair! Bring it to the experts at Behnam Rugs. Most damage done by these culprits can be repaired. The value of your rug won’t be the same, but repairs can restore at least some of the worth to your rug. Call 972-733-0400.